Data portability and thinking ahead to 2008

So-called data portability and data ownership is a hot topic of late, and with good reason: with all the talk of the opening of social networking sites and the loss of presumed privacy, there’s been a commensurate acknowledgment that the value is not in the portability of widgets (via OpenSocial et al) but instead, (as Tim O’Reilly eloquently put it) it’s the data, stupid!

Now, Doc’s call for action is well timed, as we near the close of 2007 and set our sights on 2008.

Earlier this year, ZDNet predicted that 2007 would be the year of OpenID, and for all intents and purposes, it has been, if only in that it put the concept of non-siloed user accounts on the map. We have a long way to go, to be sure, but with OpenID 2.0 around the corner, it’s only a matter of time before building user prisons goes out of fashion and building OpenID-based citizen-centric services becomes the norm.

Inspired by the fact that even Mitchell Baker of Mozilla is talking about Firefox’s role in the issue of data ownership (In 2008 … We find new ways to give people greater control over their online lives — access to data, control of data…), this is going to be issue that most defines 2008 — or at least the early part of the year. And frankly, we’re already off to a good start. So here are the things that I think fit into this picture and what needs to happen to push progress on this central issue:

  • Economic incentives and VRM: Doc is right to phrase the debate in terms of VRM. When it comes down to it, nothing’s going to change unless 1) customers refuse to play along anymore and demand change and 2) there’s increased economic benefit to companies that give back control to their customers versus those companies that continue to either restrict or abuse/sell out their customers’ data. Currently, this is a consumer rights battle, but since it’s being fought largely in Silicon Valley where the issues are understood technically while valuations are tied to the attractiveness a platform has to advertisers, consumers are at a great disadvantage since they can’t make a compelling economic case. And given that the government and most bureaucracy is fulled up with stakeholders who are hungry for more and more accurate and technologically-distilled demographic data, it’s unlikely that we could force the issue through the legal system, as has been approximated in places like Germany and the UK.
  • Reframing of privacy and access permissions: I’ve harped on this for awhile, but historic notions of privacy have been out-moded by modern realities. Those who do expect complete and utter control need to take a look at the up and coming generation and realize that, while it’s true that they, on a whole, don’t appreciate the value and sacredness of their privacy, and that they’re certainly more willing to exchange it for access to services or to simply dispense with it altogether and face the consequences later (eavesdroppers be damned!), their apathy indicates the uphill struggle we face in credibly making our case.

    Times have changed. Privacy and our notions of it must adapt too. And that starts by developing the language to discuss these matters in a way that’s obvious and salient to those who are concerned about these issues. Simply demanding the protection of one’s privacy is now a hollow and unrealistic demand; now we should be talking about access, about permissions, about provenance, about review and about federation and delegation. It’s not until we deepen our understanding of the facets of identity, and of personal data and of personal profiles, tastestreams and newsfeeds that can begin to make headway on exploring the economic aspects of customer data and who should control it, have access to it,

  • Data portability and open/non-proprietary web standards and protocols: Since this is an area I’ve been involved in and am passionate about, I have some specific thoughts on this. For one thing, the technologies that I obsess over have data portability at their center: OpenID for identification and “hanging” data, microformats for marking it up, and OAuth for provisioning controlled access to said data… The development, adoption and implementation of this breed of technologies is paramount to demonstrating both the potential and need for a re-orientation of the way web services are built and deployed today. Without the deployment of these technologies and their cousins, we risk web-wide lock-in to vender-specific solutions like Facebook’s FBML or Google’s , greatly inhibiting the potential for market growth and innovation. And it’s not so much that these technologies are necessarily bad in and of themselves, but that they represent a grave shift away from the slower but less commercially-driven development of open and public-domained web standards. Consider me the frog in the luke warm water recognizing that things are starting to get warm in here.
  • Citizen-centric web services: The result of progress in these three topics is what I’m calling the “citizen-centric web”, where a citizen is anyone who inhabits the web, in some form or another. Citizen-centric web services, are, of course, services provided to those inhabitants. This notion is what I think is, and should, going to drive much of thinking in 2008 about how to build better citizen-centric web services, where individuals identify themselves to services, rather than recreating themselves and their so-called social-graph; where they can push and pull their data at their whim and fancy, and where such data is essentially “leased” out to various service providers on an as-needed basis, rather than on a once-and-for-all status using OAuth tokens and proxied delegation to trusted data providers; where citizens control not only who can contact them, but are able to express, in portable terms, a list of people or companies who cannot contact them or pitch ads to them, anywhere; where citizens are able to audit a comprehensive list of profile and behavior data that any company has on file about them and to be able to correct, edit or revoke that data; where “permission” has a universal, citizen-positive definition; where companies have to agree to a Creative Commons-style Terms of Access and Stewardship before being able to even look at a customer’s personal data; and that, perhaps most import to making all this happen, sound business models are developed that actually work with this new orientation, rather than in spite of it.

So, in grandiose terms I suppose, these are the issues that I’m pondering as 2008 approaches and as I ready myself for the challenges and battles that lie ahead. I think we’re making considerable progress on the technology side of things, though there’s always more to do. I think we need to make more progress on the language, economic, business and framing fronts, though. But, we’re making progress, and thankfully we’re having these conversations now and developing real solutions that will result in a more citizen-centric reality in the not too distant future.

If you’re interested in discussing these topics in depth, make it to the Internet Identity Workshop next week, where these topics are going to be front and center in what should be a pretty excellent meeting of the minds on these and related topics.

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hCard for OpenID Simple Registration and Attribute Exchange

Microformats + OpenID

One of the many promises of OpenID is the ability to more easily federate profile information from an identity provider to secondary consumer applications. A simple example of this is when you fill out a basic personal profile on a new social network: if you’ve ever typed your name, birthday, address and your dog’s name into a form, why on earth would you ever have to type it again? Isn’t that what computers are for? Yeah, I thought so too, and that’s why OpenID — your friendly neighborhood identity protocol — has two competing solutions for this problem.

Unfortunately, both Simple Registration (SREG for short) and its potential successor Attribute Exchange (AX) go to strange lengths to reinvent the profile data wheel with their own exclusive formats. I’d like to propose a vast simplification of this problem by adopting attributes from the standard (also known as ). As you probably know, it’s this standard that defines the attributes of the and therefore is exceptionally appropriate for the case of OpenID (given its reliance on URLs for identifiers!).

Very quickly, I’ll compare the attributes in each format so you get a sense for what data I’m talking about and how each format specifies the data:

Attribute SREG AX vCard
Nickname openid.sreg.nickname namePerson/friendly nickname
Full Name openid.sreg.fullname namePerson n (family-name, given-name) or fn
Birthday openid.sreg.dob birthDate bday
Gender openid.sreg.gender gender gender
Email openid.sreg.email contact/email email
Postal Code openid.sreg.postcode contact/postalCode/home postal-code
Country openid.sreg.country contact/country/home country-name
Language openid.sreg.language pref/language N/A
Timezone openid.sreg.timezone pref/timezone tz
Photo N/A media/image/default photo
Company N/A company/name org
Biography N/A media/biography note
URL N/A contact/web/default URL

Now, there are a number of other other attributes beyond what I’ve covered here that AX and vCard cover, often overlapping in the data being described, but not in attribute names. Of course, this creates a pain for developers who want to do the right thing and import profile data rather than having folks repeat themselves yet again. Do you support SREG? AX? hCard? All of the above?

Well, regular people don’t care, and shouldn’t care, but that doesn’t mean that this isn’t a trivial matter.

Microformat glueInstead, the barriers to doing the right thing should be made as low as possible. Given all the work that we’ve done promoting microformats and the subsequent widespread adoption of them (I’d venture that there are many million hcards in the wild), it only makes sense to leverage the upward trend in the adoption of hcard and to use it as a parallel partner in the OpenID-profile-exchange dance.

While AX is well specified, hCard is well supported (as well as well-specified). While AX is extensible, hCard is too. Most importantly, however, hcard and vcard is already widely supported in existing applications like Outlook, Mail.app and just about every mobile phone on the planet and in just about any other application that exchanges profile data.

So the question is, when OpenID is clearly a player in the future and part of that promise is about making things easier, more consistent and more citizen-centric, why would we go and introduce a whole new format for representing person-detail-data when a perfectly good one already exists and is so widely supported?

I’m hoping that reason and sense will prevail and that OpenID and hCard will naturally come together as two essential building blocks for independents. If you’re interested in this issue, please blog about it or express your support to specs@openid.net. I think the folks working on this spec need to hear from folks who make, create, build or design websites and who recognize the importance and validity of betting on, and support and adopting, microformats.

OpenID on the iPhone

During the OpenID/Oauth Session

I helped lead a session on Saturday at iPhoneDevCamp on the topic of OpenID and Oauth (a new protocol a group of us have been developing) to a packed room of developers, designers and interested parties.

My basic premise was that if you’re going to be developing an application for the iPhone that has any kind of account or social functionality that you should dispense with creating yet another identity silo and instead make use of OpenID. Among the reasons I cited:

  • Safari on the iPhone doesn’t have a password manager like 1Passwd and won’t be able to import all the Firefox passwords you’ve been recording for years. And, as mobile web browsers become more powerful, remembering web service account credentials will become more important (and more of a burden). Better to make it easy on your customers — one OpenID url, one username and password.
  • if you’ve logged in with OpenID on a web service on your desktop or laptop and have set your provider to always allow you to login in automatically, logging in on the iPhone will require you to only login to your OpenID provider and then enter your URL once for every web service that you want to login to. This means that you avoid the challenge of invisibly typing in your password over and over on the error prone touchscreen keyboard.
  • The ability to cross-polinate authenticated data using a combination of OpenID and Oauth while remote will be increasingly valuable, especially if the expectation is that applications are going to be entirely web-driven. When you’re dealing with desktop apps, you’re operating off a harddrive with known permissions; when you’re passing between web apps, the permission model is radically different and, just as when you go to check out from Amazon you always have to authenticate, developing patterns for this experience between web apps needs refinement. OpenID can help smooth out that interaction.

iSignin OpenID signin for OpenIDLastly, there is work going on (okay, I’m doing it so far) to make the OpenID login experience on the iPhone (and elsewhere) trump any kind of old school login system available. This obviously needs a lot of work and new thinking (maybe instead of authenticating by typing a password you have to SMS a unique shortcode, etc) but I think your money should be on OpenID if you’re going to be developing account-based web applications on the iPhone — or — generally.